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Thread: Coyotes

  1. #1
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    Coyotes

    Coyotes are a part of american history just as wolves,deer,and buffalo are. So why do most states allow open hunting on these animals year round. Their are some states that even pay bounty on them. These animal yes do hunt in packs and to my know,edge have never attack a human. They are apart of the eco system and killing these animals will produce other nuisance wildlife species. I believe they can be controled by mechanical measures to detour them from killing livestock. States however make it easy for them just to be hunted and killed. One day in the future we will be passing laws to protect them but it will be to late. Why do we kill rather than protect ?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardsanima View Post
    Coyotes are a part of american history just as wolves,deer,and buffalo are. So why do most states allow open hunting on these animals year round. Their are some states that even pay bounty on them. These animal yes do hunt in packs and to my know,edge have never attack a human. They are apart of the eco system and killing these animals will produce other nuisance wildlife species. I believe they can be controled by mechanical measures to detour them from killing livestock. States however make it easy for them just to be hunted and killed. One day in the future we will be passing laws to protect them but it will be to late. Why do we kill rather than protect ?
    In my opinion, it probably depends on the situation. Obviously, I don't have farm animals myself (though I do have two dogs), and even here in Washington, you are bound to have a coyote sighting or two every now and then, but perhaps setting up a good fence (that is nearly impossible to jump over) could be a good deterrant for coyotes. On the otherhand, if you feel threatened by a coyote or see a coyote threatening someone or something, then defensive action will be needed. For example, if you see a coyote attacking or getting too close to a child, dog, etc, then you do have to take protective measures somehow, which may include shooting the coyote. However, if you are hunting coyotes for sport, then perhaps setting limits on how many coyotes people can kill each year could be a good way to both control the coyote population and avoid endangering the coyote population if you know what I mean.

  3. #3
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    Killing coyotes doesn't allow other nuisance species to move in. It actually works as a vacuum effect: if some coyotes are killed in one time, then another pack will move in. they are also much more highly adaptable creatures than you think. Too many coyotes are found and are living in urban areas, which can lead to problems with pets, children and people. And 'yotes have been known to attack people, particularly if a) they're rabid or b) have no fear (and thus no respect) for people.

    The only deterrent to keep coyotes from attacking livestock is to keep them well-fed enough to not want to hunt and kill young calves, lambs, chickens or the like. No fences will stop a coyote, as they never jump over, but rather can dig their way under. And it's the packs of coyotes that are a bigger threat than those that are single, as they are crafty beggars when it comes to wanting to kill a calf or two for food or for the fun of it.

    Coyotes are highly adaptable critters, and killing them does not affect their population like with killing wolves and bears. Scientists have noted that coyotes actually thrive under adversity, that they actually grow, well, smarter and more cautious when under threat of getting killed by a pack of wolves or by angry ranchers. They always find a way to make more pups and increase or maintain their population even if they get or other coyotes get shot and killed.

    The other thing is that coyotes often get the blame for damage done by roaming dogs, be they stray or someone's beloved Fido, because I've heard plenty of stories (and had personal experience as well) of neighbor's dogs wreaking more havoc on livestock than coyotes can.

  4. #4
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    I do like coyotes--there have been numerous instances of coyotes attacking humans, however, especially children. It's very rare, but it's far from unheard of. I agree that lethal 'control' is virtually always counterproductive, and non-lethal deterrants are proving to work best. Folks who have livestock should get some LGDs and bean bag shots. Most coyotes will be content to control rodents on range land without trying to take down cattle or sheep.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardsanima View Post
    Coyotes are a part of american history just as wolves,deer,and buffalo are. So why do most states allow open hunting on these animals year round. Their are some states that even pay bounty on them. These animal yes do hunt in packs and to my know,edge have never attack a human. They are apart of the eco system and killing these animals will produce other nuisance wildlife species. I believe they can be controled by mechanical measures to detour them from killing livestock. States however make it easy for them just to be hunted and killed. One day in the future we will be passing laws to protect them but it will be to late. Why do we kill rather than protect ?
    The sad reality is that livestock has a dollar value, 'yotes don't. People spend hundreds of thousands of dollars per year on hunting trips, equipment, guides, rifles...and that will never ever change.

    In Alberta, they're doing a wolf cull with poison. The idea is that there are too many wolves, and they're killing our moose, deer, elk, caribou and bison in such numbers that we apparently can't hope to have hunting opportunities in the future.

    I see this differently. It's not about the wolf population, it's about taking from them and giving to ourselves. How dare the wolves kill a calf moose, it could have grown to a 60 incher and someone could have had it as a trophy!

    Move them..more will move in. Kill them, more will move in. If the habitat is there to support them, they will always always move in.

    A TNR program won't work, because the altered animals will be shunned and new ones appointed in their places.

    The way nature works is that sometimes the prey species is on the up, and the predators are on the down. One year you'll be over-run with rabbits, next year, too many coyotes, no rabbits. What to do? Kill the coyotes!

    Apparently I'm having a very sarcastic rant over here, lol.

    I think that the wolves and coyotes that are being detrimental to the domestic livestock need to be moved to the areas where there are SO many deer that they're getting sick. How's that for a problem solver! Too bad it wouldn't work or else the wolves would be there already.

    I am a member of an outdoorsmen/woman forum and I see daily photos of dead wolves, it makes me so sad. People call them in with doe and calf/fawn calls and shoot them when they show up. Predator hunting is a big deal once deer season is over. The cougar hunts are the worst, guys are losing dogs every day...

    I just want to know what happens once we kill all the predators.
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  6. #6
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    i am glad to live in a state where you cant posion wildlife i remove the coyo.s and relocate them rather than kill them and hopefully i wont be caught.i belive wildlife has a right to exsist and do serve a purpose.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]"WORKING HARD EVERYDAY TO IMPROVE ANIMAL LIFE AND WILL NEVER STOP UNTIL THE WORK IS DONE"
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardsanima View Post
    i am glad to live in a state where you cant posion wildlife i remove the coyo.s and relocate them rather than kill them and hopefully i wont be caught.i belive wildlife has a right to exsist and do serve a purpose.
    The problem I see with relocation is that you're putting the 'yotes somewhere so that it's someone else's problem to deal with, and that can make for some pretty angry neighbors, distant or otherwise. Sure hunting yotes doesn't exactly solve the problem, but at least it lessens the possibility of the existing pack getting bigger than it should.

    Coyotes are not going to go the way of the wolf or the grizzly bear anytime soon, I can guarantee you that. Of course wildlife has a right to live, but humans have a right to shoot any coyotes that cause loss of livestock or anything similar. Relocating them just makes it someone else's problem, and even may just give them an excuse to take a long trek back to where it came from anyway.

    JMO.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardsanima View Post
    Coyotes are a part of american history just as wolves,deer,and buffalo are. So why do most states allow open hunting on these animals year round. Their are some states that even pay bounty on them. These animal yes do hunt in packs and to my know,edge have never attack a human. They are apart of the eco system and killing these animals will produce other nuisance wildlife species. I believe they can be controled by mechanical measures to detour them from killing livestock. States however make it easy for them just to be hunted and killed. One day in the future we will be passing laws to protect them but it will be to late. Why do we kill rather than protect?
    It's probably because man still believes it is his automatic birthright to have dominion over all the animals that creepeth over the earth?

    I don't hold with trophy hunting or the deliberate and wanton killing of a predator species just because the natural environment of that creature is gradually being eroded by man's uncontrollable numbers.

    If a man and his livestock are at risk of predation then he should invest in a more natural form of predator control such as the Sarplaninac.
    It is said that where ever the Sar' walks the Wolf never will.
    In Finland this has proven to be fact.
    Those who had experienced the nuisance of predators introduced the animal into their immediate surroundings and as a result of the efficient patrolling of the Sar', soon reduced the number of attacks to zero.

    It is illegal to kill a Wolf in Finland because they are a protected species.
    However, if the predator is known to be causing a problem in the area proof of its nuisance must be provided before a special licence to kill it is issued.
    If God had a Dog it would be a Sarplaninac.

    Gentle as the Lamb, Ruthless as the Wolf
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  9. #9
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    Zaros, many of us here are not from where you are, so could you do us all a favor and explain what you mean by "Sarplaninac"? Never heard of the word myself and would love to be taught what it means.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildrosebeef View Post
    Zaros, many of us here are not from where you are, so could you do us all a favor and explain what you mean by "Sarplaninac"? Never heard of the word myself and would love to be taught what it means.
    I'd be very happy to explain the meaning of ‘Sarplaninac’ to you.

    Category; ‘Ovcharka’ Old Russian meaning ‘Guardian of the Flock’

    The Sarplaninac is a member of the Molosser family, an old world breed of Dog which dates back many thousands of years and was originally bred by the Molossi tribe, from which the name derives. The term ‘Molosser’ includes any large boned, heavily built Dog.

    The image of the Molosser can often be seen on many Roman and Greek artefacts.
    The great philosopher Aristotle claimed the true Molosser should have the appearance of a Lion and be Lion like with a nature as equally fearless.
    (The appearance of the Tibetan Mastiff is a prime example.)

    The Sar’ is believed to have been bred by nomadic herdsman to protect their migrating livestock against marauding and opportunistic predators, such as Wolves, Bears and any other would be predator.
    These herdsmen, who were thought to have originated in or around Asia Minor and wandered throughout Europe, required a dog that was both peaceful and yet ferocious and courageous in the face of danger.
    The Sarplaninac quickly proved to be endowed with these intrinsic qualities in addition to its unwavering loyalty that would, according to legend and myth, see the dog sacrifice its own life to protect that of his master and family.

    Legend also has it that Alexander the Great chose the Sarplaninac breed for his Dogs of War because of their fearless character. Complete with body armour and heavily spiked collars, they would be sent forward to instil fear and terror in the hearts of his enemy.

    The history of the Sarplaninac will always be one of a contentious nature because of the political rivalry which continues to divide people and whole nations who readily lay claim to its heritage.

    The Shar Mountain Dog. (Albanian, Illyrian, Serbian, Kosovan, Macedonian Yugoslav Shepherd dog)

    The name Sarplaninac comes from the Sar Planina/Shar Planina; the mountain range in the Balkans extending from southern Serbia (Kosovo) and the northwest of the Republic of Macedonia to the north eastern Albania.
    As the Sarplaninac has been bred by many different nationalities in and around this vast area, it is not possible to determine any one nation, who could truly claim the dog as its own.
    The Sars’ true identity has been lost forever in the dust that was once great empires.

    The Sarplaninac is a calm and very affectionate creature to its immediate family (his master and his master’s family) and its wards (Livestock). Yet at the opposite end of his signature curved tail lays an indefatigable brain.
    The Sar’ is an independent and forward thinker, he makes an excellent working Dog, excels in a working environment, and can outwit a human with ease often making decisions on their behalf.

    The Sar’ is not an impulsive animal but he will by impulse explore anything and everything that he believes warrants a closer investigation.
    For the Sar’ investigative work is a serious business. He likes to know what is occurring within the boundaries of the territory he perceives as his own and cannot rest until he is satisfied that all is as well as it was before his curiosity became aroused.

    The Sar’ is a tenacious animal and is not averse to challenging a supposed adversary much larger than himself.

    The Sar’ is naturally cautious, curious too, of all strangers who wander onto or approach their territory and will warn them to stay away by barking in volumes. This behaviour does not make him a dangerous animal. His history is one of protecting entire village communities against outsiders and, therefore, you would be well advised to listen very carefully to him.

    Because of his intrinsic nature it is imperative that socialisation with other people he is unfamiliar with is carried out from the earliest age possible. An exercise that should be repeated at regular intervals.

    The Sarplaninac requires space and tranquillity and it is unwise and cruel to subject this animal to a life in suburbia.

    These Dogs are natural Sentinels and confining them to a suburban life would be an inconsiderate and cruel act because they would seldom find the opportunity to rest.
    Driven by instinctive they would constantly be observing the movements and activities of the entire neighbourhood. Such surroundings would invariably lead to the Dog becoming stressed.
    The Sarplaninac requires and benefits from space, the freedom to explore and the tranquillity of a fairly constant environment.

    We have two Sars', Zara and Oscar, and they are strictly pets.

    Oscar being a male weighs in excess of 70 kilos and stands 75cms at the shoulder
    Zara is considerably smaller than her mate weighing around 55 kilos+ and stands 60cms at the shoulder.
    http://media9.dropshots.com/photos/7...106/030405.jpg
    http://media10.dropshots.com/photos/...002/230242.jpg
    Last edited by Zaros; 02-29-2012 at 04:53 AM.
    If God had a Dog it would be a Sarplaninac.

    Gentle as the Lamb, Ruthless as the Wolf
    .

  11. #11
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    Hunting everything

    Quote Originally Posted by edwardsanima View Post
    Coyotes are a part of american history just as wolves,deer,and buffalo are. So why do most states allow open hunting on these animals year round. Their are some states that even pay bounty on them. These animal yes do hunt in packs and to my know,edge have never attack a human. They are apart of the eco system and killing these animals will produce other nuisance wildlife species. I believe they can be controled by mechanical measures to detour them from killing livestock. States however make it easy for them just to be hunted and killed. One day in the future we will be passing laws to protect them but it will be to late. Why do we kill rather than protect ?
    We are running out of things to kill. What truthfully upsets me are the animals, including Coyotes are all up for grabs. I am especially upset because this gives them the right to hunt at night and a hunter can shoot anything and not get caught. Wild Life and BLM Would have you think they are a nuisance. If you want to really help with that, our poor stray and neglected animals, it would be in our best interest to shoot stray dogs during the day. That remark was not serious, but would work.

    Maybe owners would make sure not to let their
    dogs run loose. But dogs are the only animal I know of that are real nuisances. Open season on dog packs or dogs killing livestock --- Shoot to kill!
    Lesley

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