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Thread: Prolapsed Rectum male puppy

  1. #1
    sotmog Guest

    Prolapsed Rectum male puppy

    I took my boxer puppy to the vet for his wellness exam & to get answers to other questions. I'm a new owner, so I have 10 million + questions regarding my little puppy. Sadly, the vet discovered that my puppy has a prolapsed rectum.
    I've noticed it when he has a bowel movement, but didn't know what it was. The vet explained that it is a congenital defect. He suggests I contact the breeder for a refund.
    I DON'T want a refund, I just want to know if anyone has ever heard of this condition? If so, has the outcome been good?

    Thanks In Advance.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by sotmog
    I took my boxer puppy to the vet for his wellness exam & to get answers to other questions. I'm a new owner, so I have 10 million + questions regarding my little puppy. Sadly, the vet discovered that my puppy has a prolapsed rectum.
    I've noticed it when he has a bowel movement, but didn't know what it was. The vet explained that it is a congenital defect. He suggests I contact the breeder for a refund.
    I DON'T want a refund, I just want to know if anyone has ever heard of this condition? If so, has the outcome been good?

    Thanks In Advance.
    I would contact the breeder as maybe they will at least help pay for the medical on the pup...

    I haven't had any experience with this .... I wish I could be of more help.


    My prayers that he is OK.
    Therese, Patch O' Pits Proud Mom

  3. #3
    JustJo Guest
    Perhaps this is what is causing the smell you keep noticing? I am so sorry to hear this. I have no experience with it but here are a few things I found on the Web in regards to it. Everything I found pointed towards either intestinal parasites, constipation, or some other kind of straining (such as giving birth) that causes this. According to the book GUIDE TO CONGENITAL AND HERITABLE DISORDERS IN DOGS, Published by The Association of Veterinarians for Animal Rights, The only breed of dog that is congenitally at risk for this is the Labrador Retriever. Boxers are not. Was the breeder a reputable and well known Boxer breeder? I don't want to second guess a vet but it seems more likely that this puppy had a bad case of worms or was on an improper diet causing this prolapse. You can do some surfing yourself but here is one of the many articles I read:

    From Foothills Animal Hospital:

    Rectal prolapse is the result of severe straining to pass stools. A portion of the colon (lower digestive tract) turns inside out. This is similar to turning a sock inside out. A rectal prolapse is the extrusion (pushing out) of the inner layers of the rectum through the anus. It is often a result of straining to defecate, urinate or give birth. Diseases causing straining in the puppy or kitten, such as constipation, parasites or diarrhea, may cause a displacement or protrusion of the rectum. Cats or dogs straining to urinate because of urinary infections or other urinary disease may cause the rectum to prolapse. The condition may also occur in a female dog or cat during a difficult birth. The rectum will appear as a reddened "sausage-like" protrusion from the anus. The prolapsed rectum may extend two to several inches from the body.

    What are the symptoms?
    A visual inspection and notation of a reddened "sausage or doughnut-like" mass protruding from the anus provides a diagnosis of rectal prolapse.

    What are the risks?
    Left untreated, a dog will be unable to eliminate stool from the anus. As a result, severe illness will develop followed, within several days, by death. The extruded portion of the anus can also be abraded or injured.

    What is the management?
    It is of paramount importance to identify the underlying cause of a rectal prolapse. Does the dog or cat have diarrhea or constipation, and if so, why? These problems, if present, must be corrected. Many cases of rectal prolapse can be manually replaced. Sutures may need to be placed into the anus to restrict the anal opening and prevent another prolapse. In severe instances in which the prolapsed rectal tissue become traumatized, the damaged rectal tissue may need to be surgically repaired or removed by a veterinarian.

  4. #4
    sotmog Guest
    Thanks Patch & Jo.
    Jo, everything you wrote makes sense. I was having a hard time finding anything via the internet (that made sense to me). The vet did check for parasites, but the tests came back negative. So far, it's cost me 400.00.
    My puppy will be going back next week. I DO believe it's his diet!!!
    The breeder was feeding him a generic dry food. She--the breeder--- told me to keep my puppy on the same food for a few weeks. He seemed constipated often & this "protusion" just kept getting worse. The vet has put him on soft canned foods---Hills Presciption Diet. He also told me not to feed him 3 times daily. I feel guilty not being able to feed him 3 times/ day.
    I hope he gets better soon. He has a very hard time with his bowel movements & often avoids going. It's just getting worse. Being a new dog owner...I had NO idea if this straining was normal doggie behavior or not, until a neighbor said it looked odd.
    You're right...maybe that's the source of the odor! I guess it's much like hemorroids--which also have a tendency to smell? The vet hasn't given me any concrete solutions...except that I should return my puppy. NOT an option!
    Maybe it's also time to find a vet who is a better detective before I end up losing my puppy because of something that could/ can be treated now.
    I surely appreciate the info!

  5. #5
    JustJo Guest
    I found another article for you:

    From Atlantic Coast Veterinary Conference 2001:

    Rectal Prolapse:
    This occurs in young, unthrifty parasitized animals, in association with tumors, and following perineal hernia repairs. Clinical signs are obvious, however it is necessary to distinguish the prolapse from a prolapse of anus and colon and intussusception of ileum.

    The prolapse must be amputated if it is necrotic. In other cases the prolapsed rectum is reduced. The edema is removed by gentle pressure and massage using soft cloth moistened with warm saline. Following reduction a loose purse-string suture is inserted in the anus. This is removed in 3-5 days. A sedative to prevent straining is necessary. No food, then a low residue diet of hamburger and white rice is fed for several days.

    Colopexy can be a very useful procedure to prevent recurrence of rectal prolapse. The descending colon is sutured to the abdominal wall by a double row of sutures.

  6. #6
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    The only prolapse I have encountered with a pup was due to a sphincter muscle that was malformed and did not operate properly. Surgery corrected it, but it is timely to reduce the chances of the tissue becoming dry and having to be amputated.
    I think the breeder should be contacted and informed, regardless if it is congenital or not. They should stand behind their pup 100%, but feeding their pups a questionable food makes me wonder just how responsible this breeder is.

    Good luck with your baby. Good thoughts and prayers are being sent.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~ Immanual Kant
    Click every day to save a stray until he finds a loving home.

  7. #7
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    Sotmog, Any news on how your puppy is doing?
    Loved by

    Zeus - 4yr Bichon
    Candy - 3yr Bichon
    Max - 1yr Yorkie

    And of course my precious girls and Hubby

  8. #8
    sotmog Guest

    Update on puppy

    Hi All,

    Thank you all for your help!!! I'm sorry I haven't been able to post lately.
    Between having a new puppy and renovating a new home, I've been busy, busy, busy. I found a VERY good Vet for the puppy.
    He doesn't have rectal prolapse. He has an impacted anal sac.
    The odor I was smelling was coming from his ears. They cleaned his ears and emptied the sac. I also learned that the previous Vet didn't have a clue about anything, to say the least!
    So, everything is great now!!!

  9. #9
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    That is so good to hear.
    Loved by

    Zeus - 4yr Bichon
    Candy - 3yr Bichon
    Max - 1yr Yorkie

    And of course my precious girls and Hubby

  10. #10
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    I have seen this a lot in kittens very young, they try to repair but can reoccur.

    good luck with your baby.

  11. #11
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    sorry, disregard my previous post

  12. #12
    JustJo Guest
    WOW! Now that really is a mis-diagnosis! I am amazed!

    Well at least the first vet WAS wrong thank goodness! Huge difference between an impacted anal gland and a prolapsed rectum. I am glad your pup is doing well.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by sotmog
    Hi All,

    Thank you all for your help!!! I'm sorry I haven't been able to post lately.
    Between having a new puppy and renovating a new home, I've been busy, busy, busy. I found a VERY good Vet for the puppy.
    He doesn't have rectal prolapse. He has an impacted anal sac.
    The odor I was smelling was coming from his ears. They cleaned his ears and emptied the sac. I also learned that the previous Vet didn't have a clue about anything, to say the least!
    So, everything is great now!!!
    Holy cow that is scarey that a vet was that wrong! I'm glad it worked out and you found a good vet to work with. I'd report the other one. Good luck with the pup
    Therese, Patch O' Pits Proud Mom

  14. #14
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    Talk about a major misdiagnosis.......and wrong end too..... Thank goodness you took him to another vet!

    What is your puppy's name? Sure would like to see a pic of him too.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~ Immanual Kant
    Click every day to save a stray until he finds a loving home.

  15. #15
    sotmog Guest
    Hi Again Everyone!

    You're all right about the first vet! He also ripped me off & I didn't find out until my new Vet told me. My puppy had eye swelling one day (right eye), so I rushed him to the closest VET. Well, this Vet charged me 250.00 for a nail clipping and some kind of dye used to check Sultan's eye ( my puppy)!!
    Being a new dog owner, I had NO idea as to how much a treatment like this would cost!! I did ask before taking him back, but they said they couldn't give me an exact figure, because they weren't sure about what kind of treament he'd need. By the way...the rectum issue sounded a little odd to me, also...I could not imagine him having a prolapsed rectum. I was actually going to take Sultan back for another appointment, but when the Vet tried to twist facts about ear cropping--- all the red flags popped up. He tried to convince me that Sultan would suffer eternally if he didn't have his ear cropped... very soon. Anyway, the new Vet freaked when he saw the treatment costs & heard about the ears! I would turn him in if I knew who I should turn him in to! Naturally, the new Vet doesn't want to incite the situation.
    My puppy's name is Sultan. I'll try to post a pic of him.

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